Glazing with Duncan Renaissance Glazes – Part One: Antique Celadon

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Hello! Welcome to my new blog series on glazing tips.

I’m starting with Duncan Renaissance Glazes. I love these glazes! I stumbled across them a while ago, I don’t remember when exactly, and I don’t remember how I found them, but I’m so glad I did. They’re user-friendly, they brush on so easy. I like glazes that are easy to use and consistent, and this glaze is one of them.

These glazes vary, depending on the thickness you use, whether it has texture or not, and how much texture it has. The more texture, the better it looks. Where you place it in the kiln, makes a difference also. Pieces placed at or near the bottom of the kiln are greener, darker and react more with the texture. The pieces at or near the top of the kiln are lighter and don’t usually have a rustic look. I also think it depends on the brushes you use as well.

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I use fan brushes for most of my pieces. I use a small brush for the rims, edges and for detail work. For small pieces like ornaments, I use a small fan brush or a small brush, when I run out of clean fan brushes.

As you can see from the photo above, my bird ornament is lighter than my birdie bowl. It has less texture then the birdie bowl, there are several areas on the ornament that have no texture at all, verses the birdie bowl which is completely covered with texture and it was placed at the top of my kiln.

Before I start glazing, I apply wax resist on the bottom of my ornaments, and then I go up the sides just a little, so the glaze doesn’t go all the way to the bottom. I apply three light coats on the top only, and two light coats on the sides. I don’t want any drips or any ornaments sticking to my shelves. When I fire my ornaments. I place them on kiln stilts to raise them up off the shelf.

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I apply wax resist to the bottoms of my birdie bowls. Then brush on three coats of glaze on the top, and bottoms except for a small area where the wax resist is. I have several sizes of fan brushes and usually use one of the smaller ones. Then I use a regular small brush for the edges.

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As you can see from this photo, the green bird ornaments all look-alike for the most part. The butterflies look darker…they have more texture, and they were placed toward the bottom of my kiln.

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This photo shows you the difference between a textured surface verses a non-textured surface and kiln placement. The small bowl at the top of the photo was placed at the bottom or near the bottom  and has no texture. The leaf bowl was placed near the top of my kiln and has a little texture.

This is what the glaze looks like on my non-textured ruffle rim bowls. The bottoms were waxed with wax resist and then three coats were applied to the bottoms, inside and rims. They were placed near the bottom of my kiln.

This heart dish was glazed with three coats of glaze on the bottom and top, using a smaller fan brush, and three coats on the sides/edge with a small brush, after it was waxed, like the birdie bowls. This one looks like it was placed near or at the top of my kiln.

The green leaf magnets were glazed like my bird ornaments, three light coats on the top and two coats on the sides. They were fired toward the top of my kiln, see how light they are. The maple leaves were glazed with three coats and are usually placed in the middle of my kiln.

This is one of my handmade dinnerware collections called Lake House, formally known as Brooklawn Park. This glaze loves texture, it makes Lake House look fabulous!

Each piece is slightly different, and completely covered in texture.

I use a large fan brush on the plates and a medium size one for the bowls. They all have three coats of glaze on the bottom (except where I waxed with wax resist), and the top and I apply three coats on the rims with a small brush.

This is another one of my handmade dinnerware collections called Tropical Breeze. They’re glazed just like Lake House, three coats on all sides. But it looks different. The glaze pools in between the raised lines.

Vintage Cottage is another one of my handmade dinnerware collections. As you can see from the photo, the plates were fired near the bottom of the kiln and the bowl was fired near the top. The plates are more rustic looking. I love this glaze!

I hope this has been helpful.

I think part two will be – Vintage Blue

Thanks for stopping by, see you next time! 

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Palmeida’s Lace

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Palmeida’s Lace

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I’d like to introduce you to Palmeida Machado

The inspiration behind Palmeida’s Lace, my husbands grandmother!

She was born on July 26, 1899…on an Island called Terceira, also referred to as the “Ilha Lilás” (the “lilac” or “violet” island), it’s an island in the Azores archipelago, in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean. It is one of the larger islands of the archipelago, and is the location of the historical capital of the archipelago, the Azores’ oldest city.

The girl on the left, is my husbands mother Laura and the girl on the right is his aunt Rose.

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Palmeida gave my husband and I…a very large collection of her handmade Portuguese lace, for our wedding. A lace bedspread, tablecloths, table runners and a lot of doilies!

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I’ve kept them well-preserved over the years. I actually only used one small table-cloth to cover one of my grandmothers vintage tables.

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I started making pottery in August of 1990, and in 1991…I dug out the plastic bag filled with Palmeida’s lace and took just a few small doilies out…to use for texture. I used them for a while, then I stopped for some reason. I’m not sure why? I guess I wanted to try something different, and then I probably forgot all about it. I’m bringing it back now. 

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Here’s a heart dish in Indigo Blue

It came out great! My husband loves it too, it’s his favorite color.

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I love this glaze!

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Here’s a close-up view

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Here’s one in cream

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On this one…I applied three coats of violet underglaze, washed it off, leaving the underglaze in all the crevices. Then I glazed it with a clear gloss glaze.

It’s so pretty!

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A true family heirloom from me to you!

Hearts

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I like making heart dishes!

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I always have pieces of clay leftover when I make dinnerware. I’m not about to smash it together and re-wedge it! So, making heart dishes, leaf dishes, and ornaments with the leftover clay, is a great way to use up all those little bits and pieces. And people seem to really like heart dishes.  

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I took this photo right after I made these. They hadn’t been cleaned yet. Now, they’re bisque fired and waiting to be glazed.

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I love these! Can’t wait to make more!

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I’ll have to make more of these, especially for Valentine’s Day!

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These are so pretty and they sell really well.

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These really sell well, too! I don’t think I have any of these left?

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These came out cute!

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I have several of these, but only glazed one of them so far.

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I think I might want to try some of those glaze combinations from yesterday’s post on these plain hearts. I might get some good results. We’ll see!

https://ravenhillpottery.com/2015/04/08/glaze-combinations/

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I think these came out super cute! What do you think? I really wanted to glaze them, but right when I was about to do that, I found out we had to move…sooner then I thought. So, all production stopped. I really should start packing, but I’ve been procrastinating. Leave it to me to wait for the last-minute!

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These are very special heart dishes, made from my husband’s grandmother’s Portuguese Lace. I did a blog post about them on blogspot awhile ago. I guess I should re-do it on WordPress. Oh, that might be my “P” post…good idea!

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And here they are…in my kiln.  

Potters Choice – Indigo Float

 

Potters Choice Glaze Indigo Float

I think it’s about time I do a blog post about one of my favorite glazes…

Indigo Float

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I’m usually too impatient to make test tiles. It seems like a waste of time to me. It’s not like you can do anything with them, and they take up space in my workshop. So, I usually test a glaze on something small, like ornaments. If it doesn’t come out good, no big deal, if it does, then I have something to sell. 

These leaves were made from a stoneware clay called #50.

The color is a little darker.

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After I test the glaze out on an ornament. I try it on something a little bigger, like these leaves. They were made with B-Mix 5

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Then I like to try something with some texture, like these birds.

Which was made with B-Mix 5

This glaze works well with texture, it’s not completely transparent, but at least it doesn’t cover up the texture like some glazes.

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It definitely works well on this texture!

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Then I tried it out on some small bowls. These came out cute!

I love this glaze! It’s so easy to work with, so nice to brush on, and it’s so reliable and consistent. Everything always comes out great, and the color is beautiful too. What more could you ask for?

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This bowl looks so yummy with these mouth watering strawberries!

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Then I combined Indigo Float with Blue Midnight

I applied one coat of Blue Midnight and two coats of Indigo Float on top. It came out great! As a matter of fact, this bowl was on Etsy’s Front Page!

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This bowl was also glazed with one coat of Blue Midnight and two coats of Indigo Float. I did some photo editing on this photo, so the color is slightly off. It looks like the bowl above. After it sold, I turned it into a food photography photo for my Etsy Shop, but I totally forgot about it, until I did this blog post. I need to list this! Even if no one buys it, it makes a great photo for treasuries.

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I made these plain heart dishes not that long ago, they came out cute! 

I just realized that I haven’t tried this glaze on any of my dinnerware. I think it’s time I do that. Hmmm, now I have to decide on which one. Should I use it on some plain plates or plates with texture? Let me know what you think!

New Heart Dishes

I love these new hearts dishes!

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I love black, and I love this color combination.

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Each handmade heart dish is made one at a time, making each one unique and slightly different.

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I think they’re elegant, sophisticated, and chic!

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See the difference in the design!

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I think I’m going to make one for myself!

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This is what the bottom looks like. I glaze the top and sides only, leaving the bottom completely unglazed.

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And here it is in purple, on white stoneware/porcelain mix clay.

I love this color too!

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So pretty!

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The bottom!

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I’m going to try some in red, and electric blue. Then I’ll try some rustic glazes and see what happens.

What color do you like?